Consequences of Knowledge

In reading and getting more familiar with the international early childhood field the sense of community becomes more apparent. As a consequence I have become far more knowledgeable about issues and trends in other parts of the world, and what different organizations are doing to tackle the challenges in the different communities.  To piggyback on this knowledge, another consequence relates to gained knowledge of the different communities as well as some of the cultural aspects, and how the helping organizations organize resources and services without encroaching on the beliefs of the citizens they serve. This particular consequence is important to note, as some of our own services are not always careful to respect dignity and diversity.  A third consequence of knowledge is that I have a better understanding of what it is to be a child experiencing and enduring long term struggles, particularly in areas of war, and underdeveloped nations. Having read about the achievements in the different communities, I came away with an understanding that the blanket of poverty does not look the same in all areas.

In order to create a strong and supportive community in early childhood, I challenge all who care about the wellness of children to keep an open line of communication.  Knowledge is power.  It is not a clichĂ©, but a truth that can aid in creating a roadway for the wellness and development of our most vulnerable citizens. With well oriented direction and a sturdy plan, every single step with count in reaching the global goals for securing productive life.

To my peers and colleagues, I thank you for helping, and I am grateful to be learning with such caring professionals.  

Published by emijg1015

I began my road to profession during my high school years. I started at a day care center. During my stead, I pursued my love for hospitality and enrolled at the Hudson County Community College Culinary Arts program. Since then, I dedicated a good portion of time in the food and beverage industry. I was always too happy to work and be engaged in every aspect, including doing dishes and mopping to bathrooms and trash. I learned early on that hard work and dedication defined who I was, who I am, and who I will be. During a time of temporary relocation I took on a role as Case Manager for a mostly Hispanic community. Here I fell in love with psychology. Soon after going back home I enrolled in the Psychology program at Argosy University in Sarasota Florida. I applied much of what I learned to how I performed my duties, how I made hiring choices, and more importantly, how to be. On the home front, I applied what I learned when engaging with my family and friends, and in doing so, I have been privileged to inspire my grandchildren to grow up with curiosity and a deep love for adventure. My family is my ultimate love, and my grandkids are my greatest motivators for wanting to pursue an educational path that allows me the opportunity to inspire a young mind. Taking a moment to reflect, I have come full circle. Evaluating the things that I have done, and the strides I have made towards positive professional growth, I return to the place where it all began, school and child care.

One thought on “Consequences of Knowledge

  1. Emily, thank you for your kind words, and wise thoughts. As you mentioned poverty is different everywhere and comes in so many forms. Our paths toward more knowledge of the early childhood field, issues, and trends make us better advocates for addressing inequalities and promoting excellence in what we do. Hope to see you in the next class.Cynthia

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